Blog 6/52 Getting Stuck in Traffic

Traffic in the Philippines is one of the hellish things you can experience. It doesn’t happen every time but when you encounter traffic from hell, four kilometers (2.5 miles) can take you hours. Is that just great? Pedestrians could beat you to your destination.

Even though it doesn’t seem like a big deal, it is to me. I don’t like being stuck in traffic, unless I have someone to talk to, or distract myself with. I feel claustrophobic. Since this is a humid country, getting stuck in traffic only means I have to keep my feet where they are for hours I can’t even stretch, feeling my sweat pool somewhere unreachable and knowing I’m all sticky. (This may be solved by getting a cab or my own car, but not everyone has money to spend, ya know?)

The traffic is actually one of the reasons I am working from home and why I rarely go out. I don’t go out unless I really need to. And it’s also because I fall asleep. Imagine me napping, with my mouth open and snoring in public transit. Yup. That’s me. And so I try to lessen my chances of doing that in public.

Have I mentioned that it’s very humid right now? The summer season has come and get very sweaty. Beads of sweat dripping from my face and my armpits. Not a pretty sight.

Not sure how to help solve the problem though. Reduce private cars? Create more roads? Oohh, I know. Let’s all become online workers! Jk.

What do you do when stuck in traffic?

Here’s some ideas on how to be productive when stuck in traffic.

  1. Do your assignments/homework. Unless, of course, you need several books and a calculator, then don’t. This only applies to those assignments that requires a pencil and notebook/pad. I did this when I was a student. I did my homework, while on the train home.
  2. Read a physical book. I’m making it clear that you should not do this with a phone or tablet. This is especially appropriate when you’re taking a public vehicle. It doesn’t only endanger you but those around you. It’s like you’re trying to attract snatchers and other bad elements. So I repeat, read a physical book. Like your notes, or a paperback. I used to see students reviewing their notes while on a jeep.
  3. Observe. Okay, this doesn’t mean you have to be nosy. Don’t read someone else’s phone. That’s inappropriate. I meant observing people so you’re alert and very much aware of what’s happening around you. Notice people faces, the people beside you. It’s also a way of keeping yourself safe as you’ll be ready if anything happens.

How about you? What do you think of getting stuck in traffic?

xoxo,
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Free Writing Course! ( by Daniel David Wallace)

Reblogging for those who are as confused as I am on how to write a decent story. Let’s do this! ♥

Wow. Since I opened my short-story course twenty-four hours ago, sixty people have signed up. The post has been shared on FB and Reddit (thank you, Daniel C). Wow! That feels really good. (The first “real” email will go out on Tuesday, so if you sign up today or tomorrow before midnight, you’ll begin […]

via Update! (A Free Writing Course) — The Incompetent Writer